kerchen/export_gr2evernote

语言: Python

git: https://github.com/kerchen/export_gr2evernote

将以前加星标的文章从Google Reader导出到Evernote
Exports previously-starred articles from Google Reader to Evernote
README.md (中文)

export2enex和export_gr2evernote

将以前加星标的文章从Google Reader导出到Evernote

执行摘要:下面给出了三种方法 - 除非你喜欢蹩脚的进口笔记, 你应该使用下面的export2enex.py或export2HTMLFiles方法。 export_gr2evernote.py使用Evernote的电子邮件提交功能,该功能会破坏 注释中的任何HTML,使其成为一堆标记乱码。

使用-h运行以查看可用选项。

如果你使用谷歌阅读器(可能即使你没有),你可能知道 谷歌宣布他们将在7月1日关闭它。我已经 在Reader中有数百篇星级文章,我想让他们进入 我有更多控制权的服务。由于Evernote存储您的数据 在您的设备本地,我发现这是一个很好的服务,以保持我的 如果/当Evernote时,云中的数据没有丢失的风险 消失了。

export2HTMLFiles获取由Google的Takeout生成的导出的JSON文件 (即'starred.json')并将每个已加星标的条目转储到编号的html文件中, 根据条目标题的名称。然后可以简单地将html文件放入 Evernote桌面客户端。 这种方法也很好地保留了音符的格式,并且 它往往更加一致(超过200个博客超过3000个条目 已经在OSX下使用此方法导入,其他方法失败)。 由于它全部是本地的,因此可以一次性导入多少笔记没有限制。     用法:export2HTMLFiles.py

export2enex获取由Google的Takeout生成的导出的JSON文件 (即'starred.json')并使用Evernote将其转储到Evernote中 导出文件格式(.enex)。与export_gr2evernote.py不同,这种方法 在保留笔记的格式方面做得很好。也, 因为它都是本地的,所以你可以有多少笔记没有限制 一口气进口。除非你有令人信服的理由使用 电子邮件提交脚本(比方说,你想要一堆丑陋的笔记 无关标记),您应该使用此脚本导出您的Reader JSON采用Evernote enex格式。一旦你有enex格式,你 可以使用桌面客户​​端将其导入Evernote。     用法:export2enex.py [options]> filename.enex

export_gr2evernote.py获取由Google生成的导出的JSON文件 外卖(即'starred.json')并使用Evernote将其转储到Evernote中 电子邮件提示功能。它没有做任何格式化它 发送到Evernote,所以它很可能在Evernote看起来很难看。 我研究了使用ENML(Evernote的标记语言)的可能性, 但显然无法通过编码的电子邮件提交备注 ENML - ENML被转义,因此它只是在注释中显示为普通文本 在Evernote。 有一个ENML编辑器(http://enml-editor.ping13.net/)可以让你 编辑你的笔记,但这是我发现的手动过程 由于所有被转义的特殊字符而导致相当繁琐(例如, “)。我认为有可能对原始进行一些处理 使用JSON可以更轻松地将此编辑器用作最终的完成步骤,但是 我还没有仔细研究过这个问题。

请注意,如果你有很多加星标的文章,你可以吹嘘你的 每日电子邮件上传限制相当容易!在撰写本文时,免费帐户 每天限制50封电子邮件;高级账户的限额为250。 为了适应这种限制,脚本会跟踪它停止的位置 每天(通过在当前工作目录中编写python pickle文件) 所以当你在随后的日子里运行它时,你可以简单地使用--continue 选项以继续您的文章转储。

本文使用googletrans自动翻译,仅供参考, 原文来自github.com

en_README.md

export2enex and export_gr2evernote

Exports previously-starred articles from Google Reader to Evernote

Executive Summary: Three methods are given below - unless you like crappy imported notes,
you should use either the export2enex.py or the export2HTMLFiles methods below.
export_gr2evernote.py uses Evernote's e-mail submission feature, which mangles
any HTML in the note, rendering it a pile of markup gibberish.

Run with -h to see available options.

If you use Google Reader (and probably even if you don't), you probably know
that Google has announced they're shutting it down on July 1. I've
got hundreds of starred articles in Reader, and I'd like to get them into
a service that I have more control over. Since Evernote stores your data
locally on your devices, I've found it's a good service for keeping my
data in the cloud without running the risk of losing it if/when Evernote
goes away.

export2HTMLFiles takes the exported JSON file produced by Google's Takeout
(namely, 'starred.json') and dumps each starred entry in a numbered html file,
names as per title of the entry. The html files can then be simply dropped into the
Evernote desktop client.
This approach also does a good job of preserving the formatting of the note, and
it tends to be more consistent (more than 3000 entries from more than 200 blogs
have been imported using this method under OSX, where the other methods failed).
Since it's all local, there are no limits to how many notes you can import in one go.
Usage: export2HTMLFiles.py

export2enex takes the exported JSON file produced by Google's Takeout
(namely, 'starred.json') and dumps it into Evernote, using Evernote's
export file format (.enex). Unlike export_gr2evernote.py, this approach
does a pretty good job of preserving the formatting of the note. Also,
since it's all local, there are no limits to how many notes you can
import in one go. Unless you have a compelling reason to use the
e-mail submission script (like, say, you want ugly notes with a bunch
of extraneous markup), you should use this script to export your Reader
JSON into Evernote enex format. Once you have it in enex format, you
can import it into Evernote using the desktop client.
Usage: export2enex.py [options] > filename.enex

export_gr2evernote.py takes the exported JSON file produced by Google's
Takeout (namely, 'starred.json') and dumps it into Evernote, using Evernote's
e-mail note submission feature. It doesn't do any formatting of what it
sends to Evernote, so it will most likely look pretty ugly in Evernote.
I looked into the possibility of using ENML (Evernote's markup language),
but apparently it's not possible to submit notes via email that are encoded with
ENML--the ENML is escaped so that it just appears as normal text in the note
in Evernote.
There is an ENML editor (http://enml-editor.ping13.net/) that allows you
to edit your notes, but that's a manual process that I've found to be
quite tedious due to all the special characters that are escaped (e.g.,
" ). I think it might be possible to do some processing of the raw
JSON to make it easier to use this editor as a final, finishing step, but
I haven't investigated that too closely yet.

Note that if you have a lot of starred articles, you can blow through your
daily e-mail upload limit quite easily! As of this writing, free accounts
have a limit of 50 e-mails per day; premium accounts have a limit of 250.
To accommodate that limitation, the script keeps track of where it left off
each day (by writing a python pickle file in the current working directory)
so that when you run it on subsequent days, you can simply use the --continue
option to continue your article dump.